The Tower, Church of Separated Silences

Video registration of the installation The Tower, Church of Separated Silences. The installation is developed by Ruben during the graduation year at the FMI Masters, department of Interactive Media and Evironments, and presented at the graduation exhibition in July 2011


 

In “The Tower, Church of separated Silences” the visitor can only visit the visual part of this interactive video installation if he decides to participate in the registration procedure of the installation. In the only individually accessible registration area an image of the visitor is made after he has looked at himself in the mirror for a few minutes. Then the door to the projection room will be unlocked and the participant sees itself projected. After a few seconds the virtual camera zooms out and you see a static group of people who all described the registration process you have undergone.

“The Tower, Church of separated Silences” is a place where you come to yourself. By choosing a temporary isolation during registration, you will be thrown back on yourself, you become more aware of your own. First of yourself and your body towards the room. This is reinforced by looking at yourself in the mirror for a few minutes. Second, the temporary isolation makes the participant aware of himself in relation to his social environment, because this connection is broken. It is managed in a very individualistic experience, an experience of yourself.

“The Tower, Church of separated Silences” is a collection of people without an underlying system of connections. It is the opposite idea of ​​the social network concept (or a Small World Network). There are no connections from the system installed and no groups of friends are formed. The collection of people seems frozen. A state that consists of snapshots of silence. “The Tower, Church of separated Silences” is therefore a place where you can register as a visitor safely, without worrying that your data will be used for links with other registered users.

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